About your Search

20130117
20130125
STATION
MSNBCW 4
CNN 1
CNNW 1
MSNBC 1
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
out and speak well. they' had several blunders on foreign policy issues. the most recent one is a failure for america to retaliate in some meaningful or symbolic way on the death of an american ambassador in benghazi. the. >> the george bush administration would have piled in there, blown things to pieces and exacted terrible retribution. that's the american way for a long time. is that the right way? would that created, however awful the incident of a death involving a death of an ambassador is, is it right that president obama says let's get this in con tex, let's not attack. wars are extremely costly, both financially and with the human loss of life. >> you just went from 0 to 60. what i'm saying is in 2000, 1999-2000. after 9/11, one of the things we learned from osama bin laden, the jihad dis and jaul kwr strongly emboldened when there was no response to the bombing of the u.s.s. cole. there was no response that demonstrated you can not do this to americans. >> what would you have done in benghazi in the aftermath. >> i'm not a general -- >> hang on. you said i went from
was unfolding. >> right. well, there is the actual foreign policy piece, then there's the partisan ranker. maggie, before this began, we were looking at hillary clinton's approval ratings. 67% favorable, 26% unfavorable, 6% no opinion. we don't know if she's running for office in 2016, right? but certainly, some of this criticism, some of this questioning, is perhaps directing at poking some holes in the clintonian armor, if you will. >> perhaps. i would go there. no, i think that's absolutely right. i think the issue about benghazi, when it initially began, was a way at getting at obama through hillary clinton, right, during the campaign, but it then evolved into something else that was about her for exactly that purpose. if the idea today was to ding her up memorably going into 2016, i don't think that was accomplished. rand paul did what he was supposed to do, it will make his base happy. it will not sway any votes. if i saw correctly, 37% of republicans approve of her. for her, that is not terrible. i mean, she has always been a pretty polarizing figure. she is leaving state departmen
of fundamental issues for a president, guns and keeping the government going and fighting for his foreign policy team. it's not like he's looked for a fight. let's face it, newtown forced everybody to deal with this. >> newtown has changed everything. >> i don't think he's looking for a fight. i think he's found one. >> i agree with you. i think since the election this has been the best period the president has had in the last four years. a lot of things have come together for him. he's in sync with the country, and the country is in sync for him. the question for the gop, are you prepared for this barack obama? you didn't seem to be able to handle the first one. are you prepared for this one who now has the kind of wind in his sails going into a second term that can be very, very good for him in terms of at least in the first six or so months laying down some hard lines for the gop to cross. i think they can, but they're going to have to make the argument, you know, from a principled position, get off the crazy noise we have -- >> don't they have -- >> distract -- >> on an issue we just talked
the neoconservative phase of the republican party as far as foreign policy goes. most republicans in the senate and the house, like the american people, are exhausted by 10, 11, 12 years of war. obviously, john mccain and lindsey graham are on the forefront and have shaped republican foreign policy for a few years. certainly john mccain has. he is in a shrinking minority. and it's shrinking very quickly. and i suspect you're going to see a return to the realism of colin powell of dr. brzezinski, of brent scowcroft, of george h.w. bush, of the republicans who helped us and democrats who helped us through that approach when the cold war. >> and this is the post-superpower era, where there has to be some pulling back, and david said it exactly right. >> i wouldn't say post-superpower. you're right, it's a new era. it's much more indirection in our application of power. the neocons are for direct use of power. this will have to be more indirect. >> and there may be surprises there, as always is the case. look at what happened with algeria and mali. >> dr. zbigniew brzezinski, dad, thanks for not wa
some key lines that might be a sign of what's to come in his second term foreign policy. let's listen to a bit of what the president said yesterday. >> we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. our citizens seared by the memory of those we have lost know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm, but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends, and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear. >> that's what i like about president obama and one of the many reasons i like him, because of that. could that be an olive branch the president might extend to nations such as, let's say it, iran, and if so, will they respond in tehran? richard engel is
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)